Access Minnesota

31 July 2013

How Peer Effects Boost Student Achievement

For the week of August 4th, 2013

For decades, it’s been standard practice for educators to group students according to their achievement levels, starting at a very early age. But peer influence is strong, and new data suggests that combining students of various abilities can produce better results. This week, University of Minnesota researcher Aaron Sojourner explains that mixing lower achieving students with their higher scoring classmates can increase diversity and improve academic performance.

  • Guest: Aaron Sojourner, Assistant Professor in the Center for Human Resources & Labor Studies in the Carlson School of Management at the University of Minnesota
  • Issues: How high achieving students improve the performance of lower achieving peers; How these effects may diminish as students get older; Eliminating “tracking” and stratification in the education system; What parents can do to prepare young children for the classroom

    Part 1

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    Part 2

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